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NOSE ART – If Webster had defined the term he probably would have noted that it was the personalization of some type of machine, usu­ally an aircraft, with a name and/or painting that reflected the present “owners" feelings toward that machine, his reason for using that machine, or his present emotions. Thus NOSE ART could express everything from love to hate to patriotism to quirks that only his machine had at the time. The actual “art" would range from paintings of gorgeous women to cartoon characters to just a simple name.

Although not strictly confined to military airplanes, that is where 99% of NOSE ART is found. One thing that all nose art had in common was the fact that it was never authorized, although in times of war it was rou­tinely condoned. Unit commanders had all they could handle in trying to keep up the morale of the crews under their command that were far from home and facing death on every mission. Anything that would break the tension of every day combat was certainly something that should be nur­tured.

One of the things that this author noted in researching this series was that NOSE ART reflected the attitude of the people involved in the war, both at the front and back home. During the Second World War, I found there were several basic themes to nose art – Sex, Patriotism, Music. GI Attitudes, Home, The Mission, The Airplane, and Luck. Sex and Patriotism were easily the front runners in the Second World War. Names such as “Abroad For Action" and “Double Busted Toby from Muskogee", with an appropriately unclothed female painting to go with the name, left little to the imagination about what U. S. troops were fight­ing for. While patriotic themes like “Nip Nipper” and “E-Rat-Icator" were usually accompanied by cartoon caricatures of Tojo and Hitler tak­ing a beating.

Thoughts of home carried a wide range of remembrances of more

Ceece was short for Cecil, the Seasick Sea Serpent, a popular car­toon show. The F-51D Mustang was flown by pilots of the National Advisory Committee For Aeronautics (later NASA). (Joe Bruch)
"De Boss" was a Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star serving with the Alaskan Air Command as a utility aircraft for unit commanders dur­ing 1969. (Norm Taylor)

peaceful times. Anything from cartoons like “Snow White" to places like ‘Omaha One More Time" – were all found on Army Air Force air­craft. The air and ground crew’s thoughts about the various airplanes were recorded with names such as “BigAss Bird" (a P-47) and “Twin – tailed Nifties" (a B-24). And there were a thousand different “Lucky Ladies."

The missions the crews Hew often reflected in the nose art. Cargo air­craft had such names as “Over Loaded." Reconnaissance aircraft were “Photo Fanny" and “Over Exposed." And night fighters carried names like “First Nighter" and “Sleepless Knights." Swing music was the sound of the era, and naturally some of the more famous titles became aircraft names. Songs like “In The Mood", “Sentimental Journey", and “Pistol Packin Mama" were big favorites throughout the war.

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And the art! The art and artists that painted those airplanes were unri-

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CALIFORNIA BOOMERANG was the California Air National Guard F – 86A that set the West Coast to East Coast to West Coast speed record on 21 May 1955. The BOOMERANG was assigned to the 115th Fighter Squadron at Van Nuys Air National Guard Base. (David Menard)

valed anywhere in history. Absolutely gorgeous free-hand paintings of females with, but usually without, clothes abounded. Quite often the artists would “borrow” a real piece of art and recreate it on the nose of an aircraft. The famous Vargas pin-ups that appeared in Esquire Magazine were copied and recopied. Cartoon characters were also a favorite of the combat crews, with Bugs Bunny and Donald Duck lead­ing the fight against the Axis Powers.

The end of the Second World War brought with it many changes. The dropping of the atom bomb signaled the dawn of a “new age”, and with it Congress created a new Air Force. And this new Air Force had new aircraft, new uniforms, and new regulations that forbade unauthorized paintings and/or symbols on the new aircraft. Nose art simply faded away with minor exceptions for elite units. This all changed on 25 June

DENNIS was a 55th Strategic Reconnissance Wing RB-47H electron­ic intelligence aircraft that was used to monitor Soviet radar emis­sions along their borders during the early 1960s. (55th Elint Assn.)
1950. On that date the North Korean communists attacked South Korea in an effort to militarily unify the country under communist rule. That attack began three long years of war between UN forces, led by U. S. troops and air power, and the North Korean and Chinese Reds. It also saw a resurgence in NOSE ART.

The nose art in Korea suffered from a certain lack of enthusiasm. The Second World War had a common goal of ALL the people – defeat of the Axis powers. They were “real” bad guys. In Korea there was sim­ply the veiled threat of a world takeover by the communists. And of the multiple nose art “themes” found during the Second World War, only Sex. Home, The Mission, and the old standard Luck remained. Patriotism was replaced by the UN mission and exemplified with names like “Red Eraser.”

The artists in the Korean Theater were easily the equal of their Second World War counterparts. But alas, the Vargas girls were gone, to be replaced by movie stars and free-hand paintings of just plain gorgeous females. Both Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell adorned more than one aircraft in Korea. Cartoon characters were still very much in vogue.

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TOMMY’S TIGATOR was one of the B-52Ds assigned to the 4925th Test Group (Atomic) that dropped live nuclear weapons on the “tar­get” at Eniwetok Atoll during 1958. (AFM)

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The Waiting Lady didn’t wait around for anyone. She was a F-104A with Air Defense Command’s 83rd Fighter Interceptor Squadron and was capable of 1,400+ mph speeds. (Marty Isham)

with Bugs Bunny and Sylvester P. Pussycat being among the favorites. But a new rascal began showing his ornriness late in the war. “Dennis The Menace" was a natural for any fighter pilot to use. Again, as it did at the end of the Second World War, the end of the Korean War saw the nose artist’s brushes go back on the shelf, with only a rare bit of nose art showing up on aircraft Hying in one of the many competition events that were staged throughout the 1950s.

The 1960s was an era that revolutionized the culture of this nation, indeed of the world. A President and his brother were both assassinated. The King of Rock and Roll was replaced by a Liverpool foursome call­ing themselves “The Beatles." There were peace marches, peace protests, race riots, and love-ins. Surfing was in and swing music was out. Gasoline was twenty-five cents a gallon, and cars had over 450

The Playmate, a RB-47H from the 55th SRW, wears the distinctive Playboy Magazine rabbit symbol on the TELL TWO fairing covering the Elint antennas. (55th Elint Assn.)

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LUCKY SEVEN was another T-33A assigned to the Alaskan Air Command at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska during May of 1969. (Norm Taylor) horsepower. And there was a war. another Asian war. In August 1964 some North Vietnamese torpedo boats attacked a U. S. destroyer in the South China Sea. President Lyndon Johnson ordered Air Force and Navy fighter-bombers to strike targets inside North Vietnam in retalia­tion for the torpedo attacks. It was the beginning of the longest, most hated and misunderstood conflict in U. S. history.

When the air strikes began the American populace took little notice. The attitude was “Oh well, we’ll whip those rice paddy daddys for

image17Homestead’s Hesperides Xlll/Guardian of the Golden Peace, was a B-52H from the 19th Bomb Wing. She was temporarily based at Wurtsmith Air Force Base during the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962. (Joe Bruch)

awhile and then we’ll come home.” But the “awhile” never seemed to come. With the war dragging on. the American people became disen­chanted with all aspects of it. People protested the war in streets all over America. Young men refused the draft and took refuge in Canada. Even the men that served and returned home were looked on with disdain. It was a very unpopular war.

But for the most part, the men that served and fought in Southeast Asia, had the same pride in themselves, their units, their mission and air­craft as air and ground crews of both the Second World War and Korea. With F-I05s striking deep into North Vietnam on a daily basis, it was almost inevitable that some type of nose art would again surface as it had in both previous wars. Names associated with the war soon were

The Playboy bunny symbol began adorning airplanes almost as soon as the magazine began appearing on the newstands. This F – 86H named PLAYBOY was assigned to the 104th TFS/Maryland Air National Guard. (Joe Bruch)
seen on the sides of the F-I05s. Names like “Hanoi Special” and “NorthBound” reflected the feelings of the crews that flew them. Again the names and art were a reflection of the times. What better name for an F-105 than “Protestor’s Protector.”

The prevalent themes of the nose artists in both Korea and the Second World War were long gone, even Sex. Yes, there was the occasional nude, but it was rare. In fact true nose art was rare. Usually the only per­sonalizing of a combat airplane in Southeast Asia was a simple name. Gorgeous Vargas girls of the Second World War were replaced by protest signs. Bugs Bunny was replaced by the new reigning king of the cartoons, Snoopy. Flag-waving slogans like “American Beauty” was translated to the image of the working class – “The Silent Majority.” And bomber aircraft like the B-52Ds had no art at all!

By far the most recognizable female was Little Annie Fannie, a Playboy Magazine cartoon cutie with enormous attributes. “Annie” made an appearance on many Southeast Asian aircraft. But she was the rarity, not the norm. Most of the “art” was simply an expression of the day, or a whim. “Crown Seven” was something you drank to forget the war, and the name of a F-105F Wild Weasel. “Peanuts” was the name of the comic strip that Snoopy came from, and the name of an awesome AC-l I9K gunship. Most of the “art” was cartoon form and made little or no sense with regards to the war. Some could be traced to the mission of the unit or airplane, like “SAM Fighter” and “Butterfly Bomber.” Values had changed and so had the nose art, for much of it was anti-war in nature.

In the early years of the war. Most of the F-I05s operating from bases in Thailand had names and minor forms of artwork. By 1968, the art had improved to the point where it was rivaling some of the better material in Korea. When the F-4Es arrived in 1969, the artwork took a giant stride in quality. The F-4E had a nice “canvas” to work with using the air intakes. Large paintings soon embellished the sleek Phantoms at Korat. They were named things like “Here Come Da Judge” and “Wrecking Crew.” The art itself ranged from the famous Warner Brothers “Roadrunner” character on “Arizona Chicken” to a large sham­rock on “Fighting Irish.” But few nudes!

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Even this art was brought to an end quickly. It was terminated in 1970 by Air Force regulations. An edict came down from 7th Air Force to

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Papa’s Sin was a TL-I9D Bird Dog flown by Squadron-Signal author Al Adcock when he was stationed at Tan Hep International Airport, South Vietnam during 1963 as an Army Forward Air Controller. (Al Adcock)

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Little John was a F-100D assigned to the 531st TFS/39th Air Division based at Misawa Air Base, Japan during November of 1961. The very colorful Super Sabres had Red, White, and Blue bands on the nose, with Red and Blue chevrons on the tail. (Norm Taylor)

remove all art from its friendly fighter-bombers! The Air Force, in its inimitable wisdom had taken away another little morale booster from the fighting men in Southeast Asia. The crews of course, simply moved the nose art to the nose gear door. But the era of nose art in the Vietnam War had all but ceased to exist. Even the maximum efforts launched during the LINEBACKER operations of 1972 were clinically performed in virtually clean aircraft. When U. S. involvement ended in 1973, the Vietnam War drew to a close, so did nose art. Art would not return until the early 1980s when Strategic Air Command began allowing certain historical units to again adorn their aircraft with historical nose art. By 1991 and the beginning of the Gulf War, nose art could be found on vir­tually all aircraft types in the Air Force. But that is another part of the story.

This cartoon caricature of a B-52 was painted on the nose of the NB- 52B that served as the launch vehicle for the X-15 research aircraft. The NB-52B was assigned to the Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB, California during 1974. (Tom Brewer)

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Trans-Paddie Airways was a UH-34 assigned to Marine Air Group 16 at Marble Mountain in the Summer of 1969. The UH-34 was still the primary mode of air transport for Marines this late in the war. (Arthur Sachel via Ernie Converse)

Tiki 2 was an armed UH-21C based at Nha Trang, Republic of Vietnam during 1963. The UH-21 was the primary mode of transport for Army troops early in the war. (Al Adcock ) (Left) The nose art on this UH-1B Huey was the Pink Panther, the cartoon character logo of the popular Peter Sellers movie by the same name. The MOTOWN logo would indicate that some member of the crew was from Detroit. The aircraft was assigned to the 361st Aviation Company. (Glenn R. Horton Jr.)

Pussycat was one of the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing’s F-104C Starfighters based at Danang during 1966. The F-104s were based in Vietnam as MiG Combat Air Patrol aircraft. Although there were several MiG scrambles and attempted intercepts, the two Mach 2 fighters (MiG-21 and F-104) never met in combat over Vietnam. (Tom Hansen)

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MIGHTY MOUSE was an A-26K Counter-Invader with the 609th Special Operations Squadron, based at Nakhon Phanom Air Base, Thailand. The A-26s flew night interdiction missions against the Ho Chi Minh Trail during 1968. (USAF)

The Grunt 2 was a standard C-47D trash hauler flying cargo and mail out of Danang in the Fall of 1966. (Tom Hansen)

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THE IRON EYEBALL was a RF-101C Voodoo of the 45th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron/460th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Saigon. The aircraft made reconnaissance sweeps over North Vietnam during May of 1970, (USAF)

SGT C. A. Shaw puts the finishing touches to “Snuffy Smith” by the open rear door of one of the FC-47s armed with ten.30 caliber machine guns. The FC-47s were assigned to the 4th Air Commando Squadron at Bien Hoa during 1965. (C. A. Shaw)

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Playboy had a skull wih a top had and white gloves as art. The UH – 21C was based at Nha Trang, South Vietnam during 1963. (Al Adcock)

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REAPER was a Bell UH-1C Huey gunship with the Mavericks gun platoon. (Eugene Schwanebeck)

The Wooleyberger was one of the U. S. Army CH-37 Mohave heli­copters that performed heavy lift assignments early in the war. (U. S. Army)

This was the typical MORNING AFTER look after a long night on Tudo Street in Saigon. The art was carried on a U. S. Army UH-1C Huey gunship. (Eugene Schwanebeck)

Charles The 1st, was a Grumman C-1 Trader Carrier On Board Delivery (COD) transport at Danang during 1967. Charles was unusual in that it had the name painted on the nose. (Tom Hansen)

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The sharkmouth marking that was very popular during the Second World War was also used in Southeast Asia. Here it is applied to a rather rare aircraft in Vietnam, a Grumman TF-9J FAST FAC of the 1st Marine Air Wing at Danang during September of 1967. (USMC)

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HOT STUFF had a devilish Porky Pig cartoon on the nose under the U. S. Air Force logo. She was a B-52F Stratofortress of the 454th Bomb Wing and carried out some of the first ARC LITE missions of the war. There are eighteen Black bomb mission markings on the fuselage side. (Colonel Robert Amos)

Eight Ball, aka Arkansas Razorback, was a F-105D with the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron based at Korat, Thailand during 1966. She was armed with four 750 pound bombs on the centerline and a Sidewinder missile under the wing for self defense. (Aircraft Publicity Bureau)

image37"Подпись: The little guy on the tail of this F-4 Phantom assigned to the 366th TFW at Danang in October of 1966 was the “mascot” of all the McDonnell-Douglas crews - the true Phantom II. (Tom Hansen)image38"image39
Bugs Bunny’s nemesis Yosemite Sam was the mascot of the Bandits Platoon of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, and was painted on the doors of the unit’s UH-1 Hueys. (Glenn R. Horton Jr.)

This Snoopy was carried on the tail of the C-47D ‘hack’ assigned to the Base Flight of the 8th TFW at Ubon, Thailand in 1967. (Tom Hansen)

Sometimes the nose art was modified when a crew was changed or the mission changed or the aircraft itself was changed. This was “PUFF” the original FC-47 as it appeared when it was armed with three Gatling gun pods. (C. A. Shaw)

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image41“Ripley’s BeLieve It Or Not” was a McDonnell – Douglas F-4D Phantom II. The aircraft was assigned to the 13th Tactical Fighter Squadron/432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Udorn Air Base, Thailand during 1966. The aircraft has a 497th TFS Night Owl added to the intake, (via Tom Brewer)

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The MYSTERY SHIP, a popular song by the rock group The Doors, was an extremely well done painting on the nose of a Huey ‘slick’ from the 57th Assault Helicopter Company at Tan Son Nhut. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

This UH-34 carried the artwork of Snuffy Smith when it was assigned to Marine Air Group Sixteen (MAG-16) at Marble Mountain Marine Air Base, South Vietnam during the Summer of 1969. (Arthur Sachel via Ernie Converse)

Snoopy II was a F-100D flown by LT Bruce Cereghino when he was assigned to the 81st TFS/50th TFW. (Dave Menard)

Подпись: -Г
image47image48“Git-Em” Bullett was one of the 4th Air Commando Squadron FC – 47Ds. The aircraft was armed with ten.30 caliber machine guns dur­ing 1965. The FC-47 Dragonships were assigned to the 14th Special Operations Wing at Nha Trang, but had detachments throughout South Vietnam to be closer to the action wherever Charlie appeared. (USAF)

Wiley Coyote holds an ‘Acme’ anti-SAM missile on this EF-105F Wild Weasel from the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat during 1967. (Jon Alquist)

Cat Killers was the name of an Army 0-1E Bird Dog Forward Air Controller (FAC) at Tan Son Nhut during 1965. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

The black bull insignia was actually a “zap” applied at Torrejon AB, Spain prior to crew E-17’s deployment to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam for ARC LITE missions with the 738th Bomb Squadron during 1965. (Colonel Robert Amos)

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image50Snoopy the WW I Ace was carried on the nose of this EC – 121 Warning Star of VW-1 at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii during 1969. (Nick Williams)

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image53"Подпись: IP**image54

Mickey Titty Chi was assigned to the 34th TFS/388th TFW at Korat during late 1965, flying missions deep into Route Pack 6 (near Hanoi). At this early date no tail codes were carried on the F-105s. (Aircraft Publicity Bureau)

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MISS MARIE was carried on the fuselage of a F-105D with the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat, Thailand during 1967. (Fairchild Republic)
“Birth Control” was definitely the attitude of the crew of this CH-47A Chinook gunship assigned to the 1st Air Cav. The Chinook gunship had.50 caliber machine guns in the windows, plus a 40mm grenade launcher under the nose and 20mm cannon on the sides. (APB) (Above & Below) No truer statement about the Vietnam War could be found than the one carried on this B-52D with the 99th Bomb Wing at Westover Air Force Base. The Stratofortress had over sixty-eight ARC LITE missions to her credit during 1968. Snoopy proclaimed for all to see – HAPPINESS IS HOME. The bombs on the fuselage side were in Red. (R. W. Harrison)

Charles Schultz’s famed Beagle, Snoopy rode The Great Pumpkin into the skies over Hanoi with the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron. During 1966 the unit was based at Korat Air Base, Thailand. The air­craft was armed with six 750 pound bombs on a Multiple Ejector Rack (MER) on the centerline station (David Menard)

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Подпись: «В® ... /ЗШ Hang On Snoopy, was an Army CH-37 Mohave firefighting helicopter at Phu Loi, South Vietnam during 1967. Snoopy was carrying a fire hydrant. (U.S. Army)

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Just the name Lawdy Miss Kay was all that was carried on the nose of this RF-101C Voodoo of the 460th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Tan Son Nhut. (AFM)

(Below & Left) FLYING ANVIL IV, another fine description of the take­off performance of the F-105, was carried on a F-105D from the 355th TFW at Takhii during 1966. At this time no tail codes were carried on 355th TFW aircraft. The ANVIL was on the ramp at Danang following an inflight emergency. (Tom Hansen)

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TUMBLEWEED sits on the ramp at Hill Air Force Base, Utah after many combat missions with the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron during Operation LINEBACKER in 1972. The aircraft has many patched panels covering battle damage. (Hugh Muir)

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Miss Minooky carried a copy of the famous Marilyn Monroe nude as nose art when the F-86D was assigned to the 25th FIS/51st FIW at Naha AB, Okinawa in the late 1950s. (Fernando Silva)

(Right) Lieutenant Xavier Guerra, was known as “X” and carried the name El Flying Wetback on his F-86D of the 94th FIS at the 1955 Yuma Worldwide Rocketry Meet. (Budd Butcher)

The High and Mighty One was certainly the correct name for the NB – 52A used to haul the X-15 research aircraft to its launch altitude. It was assigned to the Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB, California during 1965. (Tom Brewer)

lOL ROVER was a F-86D flown by Lieutenant Colonel Frank Rinn when he commanded the 94th Fighter Interceptor Squadron during 1955. The markings were typical of aircraft competing in the Worldwide Rocket Meet held at Yuma Air Force Base, AZ. (Budd Butcher)

Terry & Pirates was the name applied to the prototype FC-47D gun – ship by Captain Ron Terry and his “gang” at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida during 1964. (Jack Morris)

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THE FOO PUSSY was a standard C-47B trash hauler that delivered mail, cargo and troops all over Southeast Asia. The PUSSY was parked on the ramp at Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Saigon during 1966. (AFM )

The EC-47Ns, Ps and Os intercepted Viet Cong radio traffic during the Vietnam War. Beep! Beep! was one of these ELINT aircraft assigned to the 360th TEWS at Tan Son Nhut Air Base during 1969. (USAF)

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Подпись: Snoopy rode with Colonel Hal Comstock when he flew this F-100D with the 416th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Bien Hoa Air Base, South Vietnam during 1966. The skull marking is a carry over from Colonel Comstock’s Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. He flew the P-47 while assigned to the 56th Fighter Group during the Second World War. (David Menard)

Satan’s Chariot was a F-4C Phantom II assigned to the 559th TFS/I2th TFW at Cam Rahn Bay during 1968. The name was in White while all trim on the tanks, pylons, gear door, and tail was in Blue. (JEM Aviation Slides)

L’ll Guy was a RF-4C reconnaissance Phantom flown by Major Don Macholz, with Captain Ward Boyce as WSO. The RF-4C was assigned to the 11th TRS at Udorn, Thailand during 1968. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

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HALF FAST was a near-sighted turtle carried on the fuselage of this EF-105F Wild Weasel of the 13th TFS at Korat in 1966. The Shrike missile was the preferred weapon of the SAM-suppression units in SEA. (via Marty Isham)

SHEHASTA was assigned to the commander of the 12th TFW at Cam Rahn Bay during 1969, Colonel Floyd White. Wing commanders had three color bands on the intake (Blue, Red and Yellow) and on the fin cap. (via Tom Brewer)

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The PAHOKIE TIGER was a shark-mouthed F-100D of the 308th TFS/31st TFW based at Bien Hoa, South Vietnam during December of 1965. The shark teeth were in Yellow and the Tiger had at least 110 Black bomb Ye110 mission marks. (David Menard)

MUGLY OTHER was an EF-105F with the 13th TFS based at Korat, Thailand during 1967. The name fits the art, but not the airplane! (Aircraft Publicity Bureau)

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Cherry Buster was the name carried on the XM-156 Universal Mount on the side of this UH-1C gunship of the 121st AHC at Soc Trang. The mount is carrying a 2.75 inch rocket pod. (via Lou Drendel)

“Bits & Pieces” was both the name of a song from the Dave Clack Five and this UH-1H in Vietnam during 1969. (Glenn R Horton Jr.)

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This RF-8 Crusader had a speedy duck carrying a camera on the nose. The aircraft was assigned to VFP-62 aboard USS ROOSEVELT during 1962. (Dick Starinchak)

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Night Hawks was not a personal marking, but rather the squadron name of VAQ-33. Their AD-5Ws were assigned an electronic warfare mission which was indicated by the Black Crow symbol painted on the nose under the name. (JEM Aviation Slide)

Major Don Kirby was nicknamed “Needle” when he flew with VMA – 311 during 1968. His A-4E Skyhawk carried the squadron markings on the fuselage and his name on the nose. This was typical of Marine nose art. (Tom Brewer)

Colonel Hal Comstock flew this F-100D when he commanded the 416th TFS at Bien Hoe, South Vietnam in July of 1966. It carried the same “art” as his 56th FG P-47 in which he shot down five German aircraft. (SSGT David Menard)

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This F-100D of the 481st Tactical Fighter Squadron/27th TFW at Bien Hoa, South Vietnam during 1965 carried a Snoopy cartoon character on the nose and eight rows of Black bomb mission markings. (USAF)

Camellia City 49er was one of the BIG EYE EC-121 Hs that monitored North Vietnamese airborne traffic throughout the war. It was TDY at DaNang in December of 1966. (Tom Hansen)

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The Jefferson Airplane was an A-1H of VA-25 flown by Commander Cliff Church, that was named after the San Francisco psychedelic rock band. (Dick Starinchak)

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Carolyn’s Folly was an A-1E from the 1st Air Commando Squadron based at Nakhon Phanom in 1966. The 1st ACS was known as the RAIDERS and their A-1s flew some of the first SANDY air rescue missions into North Vietnam escorting CH-3 Jolly Green Giant heli­copters. (USAF)

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PORK CHOP CHARLIE was a B-52F of the 736th Bomb Squadron. She flew at least forty missions from Anderson Air Force Base, Guam during the first ARC LIGHT strikes of 1966. (Colonel Robert Amos)

(Right) This Grumman OV-1C Mohawk from the 131st SAC at Phu Loi during December of 1966 sports a smiling sharkmouth. (Terry Love)

Gladiator was painted on the nose of one of the UH-1C Huey Cobra gunships assigned to the 57th AHC at Tan Son Nhut during 1965. Some of the artwork in Vietnam rivaled even the best of the Second World War and Korea. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

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Captain Kim Pepprell prepares to board Jinkin Josie, an EF-105F Wild Weasel assigned to the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli, Thailand during 1968. (Kim Pepperell)

image88"Подпись: A local Vietnamese artist applies the finishing touch to “Hungry”, a UH-1C Huey gunship assigned to the 114th AHC - the King Cobras. The UH-1C was named after a 1966 Paul Revere and the Raiders tune. (Eugene Schuanebeck)image89"image90
image91image92This sharkmouthed UH-1C Huey gunship has a jury-rigged 7.62mm Gatling gun installed in the old 40mm nose turret. It was assigned to the 114th Assault Helicopter Company, the King Cobras. (Eugene Schwanebeck)

The CHERRY GIRL was actually three girls – CATHY, EVA, and JUDY, as was denoted under the art. “Cherry Girl” was an EB-66C with the 41st TEWS/355th TFW at Takhli Air Base, Thailand during April of 1969. (USAF)

“Dragon Six” was both the name/nose art and the call sign for this UH-1H Huey. (Captain Ron Botz)

Throughout every war messages have been scribbled onto bombs and the Vietnam War was no different. These 500 pound extended fuse ‘daisy cutters’ hung on an A-1 Skyraider from VA-25 carry mes­sages from the ordnancemen of the squadron. (Dick Starinchak)

Mac’s Marauders was one of the 4th SOS Spooky AC-47 gunships that served with the Detachment at Danang in 1968. The ‘ghost’ insignia was used by all the AC-47 gunship units. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

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PHANTOM 558 was the name carried by this UH-1 Huey of the 199th Infantry Brigade. (Glenn R. Horton Jr.)

(Right) Snuffy Smith has picked a bad place to sleep, on top an AIM- 7 Sparrow air-to-air missile. The intake art was carried on a F-4C Phantom II of the 432nd TFW during 1969. (via Tom Brewer)

Certainly the North Vietnamese would have considered all F-I05 Thunderchiefs as “The Grim Reaper”, considering the destruction the Thuds brought to the North. This Reaper was assigned to the 354th TFS/355th TFW at Takhli during 1969. (John Julian)

image96Charles Schulz’s favorite Beagle “Snoopy” was also one of the big favorites with the nose artists in Vietnam. This Snoopy adorns the nose of a F-100D with the 481st Tactical Fighter Squadron. (USAF)

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Nose art on Navy/Marine Corps aircraft was rare due mainly to the problems of maintaining the aircraft at sea. Blondie was a Marine F – 4B of VMFA-542 at Danang, South Vietnam during 1966. (Jim Sullivan)

Casper The Friendly Ghost, a B-52F of the 320th Bomb Wing, on the ramp at Anderson Air Force Base, Guam during 1966 ready for another mission over South Vietnam, some 1,200 miles away. (Joe Bruch)

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This was the original "PUFF” AC-47 as it appeared in December 1965 following its last mission armed with ten.30 calibre machine guns. In early 1966 it was armed with three Gatling gun pods. (Dave Menard)

WHAR’S DEM MiGS?? is a strange name for a F-105F flying the Ryan Raiders mission in 1967. The Raiders flew night attack missions at low level to develop tactics for the deployment of the Convair B-58 Hustler bomber to Vietnam. (Jon Alquist)

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I Must Go had the Wiley Coyote cartoon character painted on the nose. It was an EC-47P from the 360th TEWS/460th TRW based at Pleiku Air Base, South Vietnam during 1967. (Al Adcock)

RAMROD was one of the “Young Tiger” KC-135 tankers that kept the missions into Route Рас Six supplied with fuel. She carried ninety – six mission including forty-eight flown from Kadena, Okinawa. (Hugh Muir)

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image106"Maggies Orange Blossom Special was one of the A-1H Skyraiders of the 602nd Special Operations Squadron, flying interdiction missions along the Ho Chi Minh Trail during 1968. (Dave Colbert)

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SNUFFY, a UH-6 Beaver of the 2nd Signal Group during December of 1967 carried the Al Capp cartoon character Snuffy Smith on the engine cowling. (Terry Love)

This Hello U-10 Bullshit Bomber of the 56th ACW at Nakhon Phanom in November of 1967, had a large speaker mounted just behind the pilot. (Terry Love)

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Charles Schulz’s favorite Beagle was, of course, the W. W. I “Ace" who was constantly doing battle with the infamous Red Baron. Snoopy adorned the nose of this WC121N from VW-1 at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii in June of 1969, (Nick Williams)

Snoopy holds a gas nozzle on this KA-3B tanker of VAQ-121 on the ramp at Danang Air Base, South Vietnam during November of 1967. (Tom Hansen)

image109"Black Jack was an UH-1H assigned to the 2nd Signal Group based at Long Binh, South Vietnam during 1967. (Terry Love)

image110The HANOI HUNTER was one of the F-4Ds assigned to the 433rd TFS. This unit was one of the 8th TFW Wolfpack squadrons at Ubon during 1968. One of the crews of the HUNTER was credited with a MiG victory which was carried as a Red star on the splitter plate, (via Tom Brewer)

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Erie Gal had a Green shamrock under the name on this F-105D flown by Captain Robert Amos when he was assigned to the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli, Thailand during November of 1968. (Colonel Robert Amos)

(Right & Below) General Westmoreland used this highly polished Fairchild C-123 as his in-country transport during 1967. With its Gloss White upper fuselage the airplane was naturally named the “ White Whale” and the crew were known as “The Whalers.” (Tom Hansen)

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Подпись: ' Ля I . . irMUV

The crew chiefs are just beginning to finish the sharkmouth on this AH-1G Cobra assigned to A Troop/7th Sq/1st Cavalry Regiment in 1969. The indian head motif on the engine cowl was the insignia of the 7th Squadron. (John Cespedes)

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SALTY DOG, a F-105D of the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron, taxis past the Takhli revetments with a full load of Mk 82 500 pound bombs on the centerline station during 1968. (John Julian) (Left) A pair of ducks and the logo “FLY 362ND UNITED” was carried on a Bell UH-1D Huey at Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Saigon, South Vietnam during 1965. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

The Exterminator was one of the Northrop F-5C Tigers assigned to the 10th Fighter Squadron at Bien Hoa Air Base, South Vietnam dur­ing June of 1966. The F-5s were being evaluated as potential aircraft for the South Vietnamese Air Force (VNAF) and later the F-5A and F – 5E became the first jet fighters to be assigned to the VNAF. (David Menard)

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OL’ EAGLE EYE, an F-4D Phantom of the 435th TFS at Ubon, Thailand during November of 1968, also carried a caricature of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing’s Wolfpack symbol, (via Tom Brewer)

Lucy expresses her feelings over her unexpected predicament, not unlike the crews that served in Vietnam, “the Pea-Nut Special” was an AC-119K gunship of the 17th SOS at Phan Rang in 1969. (Brigadier General William Fairbrother)

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Unquestionably the raunchiest nose art of the Vietnam War was Cherry Girl, a F-105D Thud of the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli, Thailand. The art made inflight refueling a very interesting operation, especially for the boom operator. The Thud also has one MiG kill marking under the cockpit. (Paul Minert)

Lady Luck was the person every pilot wanted riding with him when he went to Route Рас Six, Hanoi, as this F-105D of the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing did quite often. (Jon Alquist)

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Peacemaker was an AH-1G Cobra gunship assigned to В Troop, 1/9 Cav, 1st Air Cav in South Vietnam during 1969. (George Sullivan)

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(Right) The Super Snooper was one of the RF-4Cs assigned to the 11th TRS/432nd TRW based at Udorn Royal Thai Air Base during 1968. (Russell Houston III)

The Golden Goose was an EF-105F Wild Weasel flown by “Goose” Gowell when he was assigned to the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli in 1968. (Colonel Robert Amos )

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Подпись: The Green Dragon was a RF-101C Voodoo of the 45th TRS/460th TRW was based at Ton Son Nhut, South Vietnam during late 1969. The art work was carried on both sides. (J. P. Wood via R. L. Ward) image127
(Above & Left) The Grim Reaper/Hell’s Angel was a F-I05D from the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron/355th Tactical Fighter Wing flown by Lieutenant Chuck deVlaming when he was stationed at Takhli Royal Thai Air Base during 1969. (Doug deVlaming)

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JEANNIE, a F-4C Phantom II with the 391st Tactical Fighter Squadron/12th Tactical Fighter Wing at Cam Rahn Bay, flew mis­sions ‘in-country’ against Viet Cong targets within the borders of South Vietnam during 1968. (USAF)

SATANS ANGELS, a F-4C of the 366th Tactical Fighter Wing at Danang during early 1967, carried the “Phantom” mascot as art, and had 160 White bomb mission markings displayed on the intake. (Tom Hansen)

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Freedom Fighter, was an EF-105F Wild Weasel flying with the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron/388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat, Thailand during 1968. (Jon Alquist)

WITCH DOCTOR/RECOVERY was an UH-1B Medivac (rescue) heli­copter based at Tan Son Nhut Air Base outside Saigon during 1965. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

The pilot of this night Forward Air Controller 0-2A of the 23rd TASS made sure that strike pilots knew he was below them by painting THE FAC in large White letters on the upper wings of his overall Black observation aircraft. (Pickett)

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Many of the F-105 crews decorated their aircraft with names associ­ated with the mission they flew. HANOI Special was the F-105D flown by Lieutenant David Waldrop of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat during 1967. (APB)

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“Chopper Gator” was a Bell UH-1F rescue Huey assigned to the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing at George Air Force Base, California. (Captain Wallace T. Van Winkle)

The White bulldog on the nose of this UH-1D was the unit marking of the 129th Assault Helicopter Company in 1966, while the champagne glass on the door was a personal marking. (Lex McAuley)

Colonel Allan MacDonald flew this F-4E named Betty Lou when he commanded the 388th TFW at Korat during 1969. The command stripes around the fuselage are Blue, Black, and Green (front to back) for the three squadrons in the 388th TFW. (via Tom Brewer)

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An example of the same aircraft being flown by two different pilots was this RF-101C Voodoo of the 45th TRS/460th TRW. Both pilots retained the same nose aft but changed the name from KATHY’S CLOWN to GERRY’S CLOWN. The aircraft carried three Purple Hearts awarded for a mission on 4 January 1969. (Major Wayne Roberts)

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Black Jack was a F-105D (serial 61-0063) assigned to the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron/355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli in the Fall of 1969. (Doug deVlaming)

 

Sugar Bugger has Peppermint Patty as a mascot. Patty was another of Charles Schulz “Peanuts” characters. The aircraft was an F-105D from the 388th TFW at Korat, Thailand during 1968. (Jon Alquist)

 

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Santa Вой, a C-7 Caribou with the 457th TAS at Cam Rahn Bay, car­ried this wild Christmas color scheme when they delivered presents to the crews during December of 1969. The nacelles read ‘Merry Christmas’. (Robert F Dorr)

“The Super Sow" was an expression of how the crews felt towards the flying performance of the AC-119Ks assigned to the 17th SOS at Phan Rang in 1969. (Brigadier General William Fairbrother)

A “shadow” of Snoopy adorns the nose of this NA-1E assigned to the Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent River, Maryland in December of 1969. (Tom Brewer Collection)

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The Pink Panther was a B-52D from the 325th BS/92d SAW at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington during 1970. The ‘Panther’ carried these markings for the GIANT VOICE bombing competition held at McCoy Air Force Base, Florida in November of 1970. (Ken Buchanen)

 

IRON BUTTERFLY was the name of an acid-rock band back in the states. It was also the name adopted by the crew of this AP-2H Neptune gunship of VAH-21 based at Cam Rahn Bay during 1967. The aircraft has seventy missions on its “scoreboard.” (David Ostroski)

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Thor was one of the AC-130A gun ships assigned to the 16th Special Operations Squadron based at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, that had the SURPRISE PACKAGE modifications. This modification added a pair of 40mm Bofors cannons to the awesome armament of multiple Gatling guns. The SPECTRE marking above the name was carried on all AC-130As. (AFM)

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JEANIE ll/l Dream Of Jeanie was a F-105D Thunderchief of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli in 1967. The Thud was named for Barbera Eden, the gorgeous genie of the late 1960s TV show. (AFM)

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SOCK IT TO ‘EM, was named after a popular saying on the TV show “Laugh-In.” The A-1J Skyraider was assigned to the 602nd Special Operations Squadron/56th Special Operations Wing. The Skyraider was armed with a full load of Cluster Bomb Units (CBUs), bombs and minigun pods while on Search And Rescue alert at Nakhon Phanom Air Base, Thailand during 1969 . (Don Garrett Jr.)

Colonel Paul Douglas was the Arkansas Traveler and carried those markings on all of his combat aircraft. During the Second World War he flew a Republic P-47D Thunderbolt (left) with the 396th Fighter Squadron/368th Fighter Group. In Vietnam he flew a Republic F-105D Thunderchief (below, left) with the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat, Thailand and later he also flew a McDonnell- Douglas F-4E Phantom II (below). The Phantom was his mount when he commanded the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat during 1969. (Robert F. Dorr and USAF)

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HEY JUDE, named after the Beatles anti-war tune, was one of the brand new F-4E Phantoms assigned to the 421st Tactical Fighter Squadron at Danang Air Base during 1972. It was modified with the long distance television camera, or TISEO, mounted on the wing leading edge. (USAF)

 

The sharkmouth decoration even found their way onto small aircraft, such as this TO-1D Forward Air Control Bird Dog from the 19th TASS at Bien Hoa in January of 1966. (David Menard)

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Подпись:SWAMP FOX 18 was an Army L-19 assigned to the 199th Aviation Battalion, flying Forward Air Control (FAC) missions over South Vietnam during 1968. (John Cespedes)

CHARLIE CHASERS was the correct terminology for the 17th SOS AC-119G Shadow crews that chased Viet Cong traffic up and down the Ho Chi Minh Trail at night. Charlie was mumbling something about “Help never comes anymore.” (Don Garrett Jr.)

Andy Capp was the DELINQUENT, when it was assigned to the 390th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Danang. There was a B-26K “kill?” marking on the intake and 435th Tactical Fighter Squadron zap behind Andy Capp. Zaps were applied to any aircraft that landed at a base it wasn’t assigned to. (Harley Copic)

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The Green Dragon was one of the Navy OP-2Es assigned to VO-67 at Nakhon Phanom, Thailand. VO-67 dropped sensors along the Ho Chi Minh Trail during Operation IGLOO WHITE. (Author)

 

 

The pilot and crew chief of Tigger, a F-105D from the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat, Thailand during 1968, share a fondness for both the airplane and the art. The Thud carries a full load of M – 117 750 pound general purpose bombs. (USAF)

 

(Left) Here Come Da Judge was a popular song title and ‘Laugh-In’ saying that was carried over to Vietnam on this F-4E of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron/388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat dur­ing 1969. (JEM Aviation Slides)

 

Holy Huey Batman! This UH-1C “Batcopter” was parked on the ramp outside the Bat cave at Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Saigon during September of 1966. (Terry Love)

 

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The Super Spook was a F-4E Phantom of the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat, Thailand. Lieutenant Bill Coppick was the pilot, and Lieutenant Bill Burns was the WSO during 1969. (George Koch)

Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Girard and Captain Carmen Luisi have just completed a full tour, flying their 100th mission with the 366th TFW at Danang in January of 1969. Their F-4C was named THE SAINT with the name being carried in White on a Red flag. (USAF)

Ridge Runner II was a RF-4C assigned to the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron/432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Udorn, Thailand during 1968. The aircraft carried the cartoon charac­ter “Snuffy Smith” on the intake. (Russell Houston III)

The Delta Queen II was one of the eighteen AC-47D gunships trans­ferred to the Vietnamese Air Force during 1969. (USAF)

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“Hey Bud”, was an 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron RF-4C Phantom based at Udorn, Thailand in October of 1969. RF-4Cs replaced the aging RF-101Cs for recon mission over North Vietnam. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce )

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Wahoo was one of the super-secret EC-47Ns of the 460th TRW at Danang during 1970. The EC-47N can be identified by the X System antennas under the nose and wings. (Lieutenant Colonel Barry Miller)

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(Right & Left) AI-E-gator was a F-8E Crusader of VF-24 aboard USS HANCOCK which was flown by Lieutenant Bill Olsen. The aircraft was on the ramp at Ubon Royal Thai Air Base during a stop-over in 1972. (John Poole)

L/7 Buddha, a F-4E with the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron/388th TFW based at Korat in 1969, had an Outstanding Unit Award and Presidential Unit Citation ribbon painted on the fuselage under the windscreen. (JEM aviation Slides)

Everything that operated from Korat Royal Thai Air Base was adorned with a sharkmouth marking at one time or another. This EB-66E was assigned to the 42TEWS/388th TFW in 1972. (Don Logan)

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image163(Right & Left) Easy Rockin Мата II was a F-4E flown by Captain George Koch, with Lieutenant P. K. Brown as WSO. It was assigned to the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron/388th TFW at Korat, Thailand during June of 1970. A short time later the 7th Air Force ordered the artwork removed from all combat aircraft. (George Koch)

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BUD MAN was a F-4J Phantom serving with VF-31 aboard USS SARATOGA (CV-60). The markings were added when the unit deployed to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada during 1975 to take part in an Air Force RED FLAG exercise. (Hugh Muir)

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(Right) Patches sure lived up to its name. Over its career in Vietnam the Fairchild C-123 Provider took 567 hits from ground fire, and its crew was awarded four Purple Hearts. The C-123B flew the danger­ous, low level, controversial RANCH HAND (Agent Orange) defolia­tion spray missions. The cartoon character was Snuffy Smith and the aircraft carried four Purple Hearts for the awards made to the crew members. (Tom Hansen)

BABY JANE II was a Cessna 0-2A Forward Air Controller (FAC) air­craft assigned to the 21st TASS at Phu Cat, South Vietnam during November of 1970. The 0-2 was the replacement for the 0-1 Bird Dog. (Norm Taylor)

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Major Buddy Jones flew the Memphis Belle II, a 355th TFW F-105D that was named after the famous Second World War B-17 bomber, complete with the correct art on the fuselage. (John Julian)

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image169Подпись: The Gloppita Glopita Machine was an A-1H Skyraider assigned to VA-165 aboard USS INTREPID during August of 1966. (Walt Ohrlich)Casper, *ъе

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Casper, the friendly Phantom? was a 432nd TFW F-4D Phantom based at Udorn in 1973. He certainly did not appear too friendly with that evil smile and 500 pound bomb. (Ron Thurlow)

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Andy Capp yells “GIVE *EM “L” from the side of this F-105D of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat in 1968. (Republic Aviation)

(Left) The U. S. flag was carried on a F-105D named Don’t Tread On Me. The aircraft was assigned to the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron out of Korat during 1968. (Jon Alquist)

Подпись: An extremely rare sight was nose art on any NATO aircraft at any time. This Norwegian Air Force C-119 Flying Boxcar carried Mickey Mouse’s friend Goofy on the nose. (Matt Herban)Подпись: ■SEisbiiПодпись: ■ * * *image172

Bombs were often personalized with sayings, but rarely as much as this sharkmouthed weapon on the flight deck of USS CORAL SEA. (Dick Starinchek)

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image175"The Joyce Elaine was a RF-4C piloted by Chuck Rovell, with Senor Naumann as Navigator. The aircraft was assigned to the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron at Udorn in November of 1969. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

Sometimes the artwork was extremely small but effective. This nose gear door art indicated the fear the Viet Cong had when one of the big EC-121 M Warning Star listening posts were nearby. (Mick Roth)

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The sharkmouth marking took on every conceivable form during the Vietnam War. These “dragon teeth” were painted on a F-4D Phantom of the 366th Tactical Fighter Wing at Danang. (Chris Abbe)

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The Shamrock brought the luck of the Irish to this 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron F-4E crew at Korat in 1969. The word was that one of the crew was a Notre Dame fan. (Harley Copic)

Diana was another F-4E from the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron that had art on the aircraft during1969, and then was forced by Air Force orders to have it removed during 1970. (Don Garrett Jr.)

image178The BIG COUNTRY BOMBER was one of the B-52Ds from the 96th Strategic Wing based at Abeline, Texas that deployed to McCoy Air Force Base, Florida for the 1971 Giant Voice bombing competition. (Tom Brewer Collection)

Подпись: When the Air Force ordered all the art and names removed from their ‘friendly fighter-bombers’ in 1970, the crews resorted to painting names and art on the inside of the nose gear door. GRANNY GOOSE was an F-4D Phantom of the 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Udorn during 1972. (Tom Brewer Collection) image180Подпись: Muttley the Flying Dog was carried on both intakes of a sharkmouthed F-105G from the 17th WWS at Korat during Linebacker operations in 1972. (Doug Remington)image181image182image183

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MONTEZUMA’S REVENGE, a term relating to what happened if you drank the water in Mexico, was used along with an outhouse as art on this AC-119K gunship at Phan Rang in 1969. The AC-119 could certainly rain a lot of “crap” on you. (Brigadier General William Fairbrother)

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LITTLE CHRIS was a F-4E assigned to the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron/388th TFW at Korat in 1969. The F-4Es from the 388th replaced the venerable F-105 Thuds, and carried out the strategic bombing campaign against North Vietnam from 1969 on. (Ron Thurlow) (Left) SAM SEEKER was one of the EF-105Fs assigned to the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat during 1968. The panel below the R in SEEKER was used to secure the internal bomb bay. (Jon Alquist)

El Toro Bravo (The Brave Bull) was a F-4E from the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat in early 1970, with one MiG kill painted on the splitter plate. (Don Jay)

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image187The Good Widow Mrs. Jones was an UH-1D Huey gunship from the 121st Assault Helicopter Company known as the Soc Trang Tigers. (Mike Cusick)

(RIGHT) THE YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS was another of the Soc Trang Tiger’s UH-1D Hueys. The aircraft was preparing to load troops at Soc Trang during March of 1966. (Lex McAuley)

Thumper was the name of this UH-1C Huey gunship from the 121st Assault Helicopter Company at Soc Trang. The name was derived from the Gl term relating to the sound made by the 40mm grenade launcher carried in the nose turret and the crew used the Walt Disney character as art. (via Lou Drendel)

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IRON BUTTERFLY was the name of a rock and roll band in the late 1960s, and the correct nickname for this F-105 of the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat during Operation LINEBACKER in the summer of 1972. (Lieutenant Harry Miller)

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Captain Paul Wyrick flew the CHU LAI RUM RUNNER, an A-4E Skyhawk with Marine Attack Squadron 223 (VMA-223). The aircraft was on the ramp at Ubon RTAB after making an emergency landing at the base due to an inflight emergency in 1968. (Tom Brewer Collection)

 

I don’t know what Snoopy was saying but his attitude is clearly shown by his uplifted middle finger. Trapper was a F-4D with the 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Udorn in August of 1971. The air­craft has two MiG kill markings on the splitter plate. (Tom Foote)

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Captain Ron Kilgus and Captain Ted Lowry flew Sinister Vampire, an EF-105F from the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli, Thailand. THe aircraft had one SAM site kill marking under the cockpit. (Tom Brewer Collection)

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This A-1H Skyraider of the 1st Special Operations Squadron/56th Special Operations Wing was armed with bomblet dispensers, bombs, rocket pods, mini gun pods and fuel tanks. Its nickname was BLOOD, SWEAT, AND TEARS, the name of a rock and roll band. The A-1H was based at Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base during 1970. (USAF) (Right) The City of Homestead was the personal aircraft of the com­mander of the 436th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Homestead AFB, Florida in 1969. A sharkmouth was added to the Phantom at a later date. (APB)

image195Подпись: QUEEN OF THE FLEET was a F-105D assigned to the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat. (Jon Alguist)image196This has to be one of the largest sharksmouth markings ever. The aircraft was a B-52D Stratofortress that flew the final ARC LITE strike in Laos during 1973. (AFM)

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image200"The name of this 17th WWS F-105F Wild Weasel speaks volumes. The Wild Weasel SAM hunters were certainly a BUF’S BUDDY. (Doug Remington)

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(Right) The TERRIBLE TYKE was flown by Major George Hull and Major Jerry Evefan with the 497th TFS Night Owls at Ubon, Thailand in 1969. (Tom Brewer Collection)

MIG BAIT was a 469th TFS F-4E piloted by Lieutenant Colonel Ken Coffee, with Lieutenant Colonel Tommy Fike as his WSO. A fully loaded Phantom was an easy mark for MiGs in the skies over Hanoi, at least until its bombs were dropped. (George Koch)

image203(Right) The Playboy Bunny symbol was one of the most used deco­rations during the Vietnam War. This sharkmouthed RF-4C of the 14th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron/432d Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, based at Udorn, Thailand in 1972 carried the Bunny on the splitter plate in White. (Tom Brewer Collection)

This F-105D Thunderchief from the 333rd Tactical Fighter Squadron/355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli, has a razorback hog painted on the fuselage side in White under the intake, plus the Outstanding Unit Award and Presidential Unit Citation ribbons under the windscreen. (Tom Brewer Collection)

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Captain Bob Taffet and Major Ray Costello flew Taffet’s Tee-Loc, a F – 4D Phantom with the 435th TFS/8th TFW at Ubon in 1969. A “Tee – loc” is a Thai term meaning girl “Friend” (bar-girl, prostitute, etc). (Tom Brewer Collection)

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FOXY LADY was the name of this CH-47A Chinook. The name was derived from a slang term for a good looking woman and the Jimi Hendrix popular song. (Norm Fulks)

A favorite expression used by the Chinese Communists to depict U. S. forces was Paper Tiger. The F-4E from the 469th TFS in the background certainly means business as it heads for its target inside South Vietnam during 1970. The name was in Yellow and White. (USAF)

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Подпись: Brain Damage was one of the F-4C Phantom Wild Weasels with the 67th Tactical Fighter Squadron detachment that operated from Korat during Linebacker operations in the Summer of 1972. (Doug Remington)image209TINY TIM in a steel blast revetment at Danang during May of 1970. The air­craft was on SAR Alert (Search and Rescue) for possible escort duty. TIM was one of the A-1H SANDYs that flew the extremely dangerous air rescue helicopter escort missions deep inside North Vietnam throughout the war. These aircraft were very heavily armed with bombs, bomblet dispensers, mini gun pods, rocket pods and their inter­nal four 20mm cannon. With its long range, good loiter time and heavy arma­ment, the A-1 Skyraider was the perfect platform for the SAR rescue mission until the North Vietnamese began to use small shoulder launched surface – to-air missiles. When these weapons made their appearance, the slow speed of the Skyraider ended its usefulness as a SAR escort and the aircraft were replaced by the A-7D Corsair II, another U. S. Navy aircraft modified for use by the Air Force. (Lieutenant Colonel Barry Miller)

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The Black Widow spider painted on the intake splitter of this F-4E Phantom from the 421st Tactical Fighter Squadron was actually the unit emblem of the squadron after it re-deployed to Udorn during 1972. (USAF)

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“Winning their hearts and minds” seems to be what the art on this UH-1C Huey Cobra gunship is implying – the Gl way. The Huey Cobra was from the 176th AHC at Chu Lai, South Vietnam. (Norm Fulks)

Sleezee “Dee” was the name on this UH-1H of the 116th AHC at Phu Loi, South Vietnam. The Huey also carries the Yellow Hornets mark­ing on the nose. (Glenn Morton Jr.)

Stump Jumper stands search and rescue “alert” on the 1st SOS ramp at Nakhon Phanom, Thailand during October of 1969. The mul­tiple Tan stripes around the rear fuselage indicate that this aircraft was assigned to a squadron commander. (Harley Copic)

image214"Snoopy’s dog house got a coat of SEA camouflage paint on this F – 105D named BEAGLE POWER. The aircraft was assigned to the 388th TFW at Korat Royal Thai Air Base during 1968. (David Hansen)

Lucy seems to have a problem and Charlie Brown was the cause. The White painted area covers the aircraft’s previous name. The F – 105D was assigned to the 44th TFS. (Aircraft Publicity Bureau)

 

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(Above & Left) The MUSKETS were the gunship flight of the 176th Assault Helicopter Company, flying UH-1C Huey gunships out of Chu Lai, South Vietnam during the Summer of 1971. Huey gunships had fixed M-60 7.62mm machine guns and rocket pods. Some also carried a 40mm grenade launcher in the nose. (Mike Campbell)

 

THE SAM LIQUIDATOR was certainly the correct name for any of the EF-105F Wild Weasels that flew defense suppression missions against the very formidable North Vietnamese air defense system. (Jon Alquist)

 

LOAD MASTER was a UH-1B Huey slick (troop carrier) assigned to the 121st Assault Helicopter Company at Xuan Loc in January of 1966. (Lex McAuley)

 

Oh, will that smart! “The Polish Cannon” was an AC-119K Stinger gunship with the 18th Special Operations Squadron at Phan Rang in 1969. (Brigadier General William Fairbrother)

 

ОГ Bullet was an 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron RF-4C Phantom II flown by Jack Ferguson and Barry Johnson out of Udorn, Thailand during November of 1969. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

 

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GUNFIGHTER AIRLINES was the C-47 base flight aircraft of the 366th TFW at Danang during August of 1970. It was used to take per­sonnel to R&R destinations as well as for hauling mail and VIPs to Danang. (Captain Tom Roberts)

(Right) ‘THUMPER" was another of the ex-Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Canadair Sabre Mk 6s (F-86Fs), that were used as target drones for new missile systems like the Stinger and Patriot surface – to-air missiles. (Mike Kasiuba)

Spartan I was an ex-Navy R4D transport assigned to the John F. Kennedy Center For Military Assistance at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Fort Bragg was the home of the JFK Special Warfare Center and the Green Berets. (Tom Brewer Collection)

SAWADEE KRUP was a Thai expression that roughly translated means the last plane leaving, which this F-105G from the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron was in the Summer of 1973, one of the last birds to leave Korat, Thailand, (via Tom Brewer)

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The Positive Thinker was a F-4E Phantom assigned to the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat, Thailand during 1969. Most air­craft in the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat had some sort of art during this time period. (Tom Foote)

This RF-4C from the 11th TRS at Udorn, Thailand during 1970, was named Hillbilly Slick and had Snuffy Smith painted on the splitter plate. The RF-4Cs from the 11th TRS had a great deal of ‘splitter’ art during this period. (Tom Foote)

This UH-1H was assigned to the 117th AHC, known as the “Annie Fannies” and carried the name STUMP JUMPER on the side of the nose when it was based at Bien Hoa, South Vietnam. “Annie” was “HEAVY”, especially in the frontal area. (Glenn Horton Jr.) (Left) Major J. B. Davis and 1st Lieutenant R. Mooney flew this F-4D Phantom named Ripley’s Believe It Or Not while assigned to the 13th TFS at Udorn, Thailand during 1969. (via Tom Brewer)

The Root Pak Rat was a EF-105F with the 333rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, flown by Captain Warren Kerzon with Captain Scottie Mcintire as EWO. The aircraft was credited with ten SAM site kills. (Marty Isham)

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image234"The Good Widow Mrs. Jones was an UH-1D Huey gunship from the 121st AHC, known as the Soc Trang Tigers. Later she was modified with the addition of panties. (Lou Drendel)

(Right) Miss Marlene was a F-105D with the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron/388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat, Thailand during 1968. (David Hansen)

This F-100D Super Sabre named Sizzlin’ Susie flew interdiction and ground support missions with the 352d TFS/35th TFW out of Phan Rang, South Vietnam during 1970. (USAF)

This RF-4C from the 11th TRS at Udorn carried the name Lil Bee dur­ing October of 1969. The pilot was Jack Sikes, with Gary Robbins as his navigator. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

In December of 1970 the 0-1F Bird Dogs of the 21st TASS at Phu Cat Air Base, South Vietnam had small Black names on their cowling. This 0-1F was Ronnie’s Racer. (Norm Taylor)

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The Yellow Submarine was one of the MISTY FAC F-100Fs from the 612th Tactical Fighter Squadron/35th Tactical Fighter Wing at Cam Rahn Bay during 1967. These aircraft flew high speed recon mis­sions over lower threat target areas. (Joe Michaels)

Andy Capp drinks a toast to LABELLA on the outer nose gear door panel of this F-4J Phantom II from Fighter Squadron Thirty-One (VF – 31) aboard USS SARATOGA (CV-60) in August of 1975. It is unusual to find art of any kind on Navy aircraft. (Hugh Muir) (Left) City of Columbus was named after the Indiana city where this aircraft’s parent reserve unit was based. The City was one of the AC – 1190 Shadow gunships assigned to the 71st Special Operations Squadron/14th Special Operations Wing at Phan Pang, South Vietnam during 1968. (USAF)

Armed with a full load of 750 pound bombs with fuse extenders, the SAM FIGHTER taxies to the active runway at Takhli Royal Thai Air Base during 1969. The aircraft was truly named since it was one of the Wild Weasel EF-105FS from the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron that countered the North Vietnamese Surface-To-Air Missile (SAM) defenses. (John Julian)

image239"Подпись: B.D. Worrell was the Crew Chief of PEANUT AIRLINES, a Douglas C- II7D Super Goonie at Cam Rahn Bay, South Vietnam during 1971. (Tom Hansen) Snoopy’s expression WAR IS HELL (in Blue just behind Snoopys head), with his dog house going down in flames, tells it all — espe­cially about the Vietnam War. The F-4C was flown by 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron pilot Larry Krotz, with Dick Bower as his Navigator. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

(RIGHT) ORLANDO.. Where The ACTION is was the name of a B-52D Stratofortress from the 367th Bomb Squadron/306th Bomb Wing that participated in the 1971 GIANT VOICE bombing competition held at McCoy Air Force Base, Florida. The aircraft carried the Strategic Air Command badge on the nose just ahead of the name. (Tom Brewer)

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Some nose art will be forever captured. Colonel Robin Olds’ famous F-4C Phantom II SCAT XXVII was restored to its Vietnam era paint scheme complete with nose art and kill markings. It was then placed on display at the Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio. Colonel Olds was an ace during the Second World War and added four MiG kills to his record in Vietnam. All of his aircraft were named SCAT. (David Menard)

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The Cessna 0-1E was known as the Bird Dog, so naturally the crews of the 19th TASS at Bien Hoa, South Vietnam in 1968 added “dog teeth” to their aircraft instead of the more traditional sharkmouth marking. (USAF)

The typical sharkmouth marking did not fit very well on the UH-1C gunship, so the men of the 174th Assault Helicopter Company at Qui Nhon, South Vietnam modified the marking to suit their aircraft dur­ing 1970. In addition to the sharkmouth, the aircraft carried two White stripes around the tail boom. (Norm Fulks)

The Irish Eagle/lron Spud was a Grumman 0V-1C Mohawk recon­naissance aircraft assigned to the 131st SAC during May of 1967. (Bob Chenowith) (Left) Major Don Parkhurst fastens the G-suit garters prior to another mission from Korat, Thailand in the appropriately named THE WRECKIN CREW, a F-4E with the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron during 1970. (USAF)

T. D.s TEELOC was a sharkmouthed F-4E Phantom II of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron based at Korat, Thailand during early 1970. A “teeloc” was a Thai expression meaning girlfriend, hooker, or whatever. (Don Jay)

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image247"Подпись: ARIZONA CHICKEN was a slang term for the venerable Roadrunner. The Phantom carried the Warner Bros, super quick bird as the art. The CHICKEN was an F-4E from the 34th TFS at Korat, Thailand during 1970. (USAF) “Ye Ole Battle-Ax” was one of the colorful RF-4Cs with the 11th TRS/432rd TRW at Udorn, Thailand during 1969. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

COPYRIGHT 1995 SQUADRON/SIGNAL PUBLICATIONS, INC

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‘KILL’ MAD DOG also carried DEATH ON CALL under the art on the nose of this UH-1C of the 240th Assault Helicopter Company, known as the “Mad Dogs.” They were assigned to Camp Bearcat during January of 1971. (Lou Drendel)

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ARNOLD was a B-52H Stratofortress with the 23rd Bomb Squadron/5th Bomb Wing at the 1971 GIANT VOICE meet held at McCoy AFB, Florida. SAC allowed the use of extensive nose art on competition aircraft. (Tom Brewer)

tumbleweed was an RF-4C from the 11th TRS at Udorn, Thailand during the LINEBACKER II operations in 1972. (Hugh Muir)

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This Boeing KC-135A Stratotanker was part of the Young Tiger force. It got its sharkmouth marking when it landed at Korat Royal Thai Air Base and personnel from the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing decided it would look good with one of their sharkmouths. (Joe Bruch Collection)

Snow Bird was a Boeing B-52H Stratofortress of the 410th Bomb Wing. She carried this name and snowflakes in White on the nose just below the cockpit for the 1974 GIANT VOICE bombing competi­tion. She also carried the Strategic Air Command badge and an Air Force Outstanding Unit award. (Tom Brewer)

COPYRIGHT 1995 SQUADRON/SIGNAL PUBLICATIONS, INC

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Air Force ordnance specialist Dale Kinbilo screws one of the thirty – six inch fuse extenders into a 750 pound low drag bomb on a Triple Ejector Rack (TER) on the inboard pylon of a 388th Tactical Fighter Wing F-4E Phantom II at Korat Royal Thai Air Base during May of 1970. The F-4E had a pirate ship painted on the intake since the North Vietnamese often referred to U. S. pilots as “Yankee Air Pirates.” (USAF)

Rosa L, a F-105D of the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron and Honey, an EF-105F of the 333rd Tactical Fighter Squadron fly formation enroute to targets in North Vietnam. EF-105Fs normally flew Wild Weasel SAM suppression missions until the bombing halt of 1968. Both aircraft are armed with full loads of 750 pound bombs. (USAF)

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Leo s Lady carries phony nose art which was applied to the Douglas B-26K Counter-Invader on display at the Castle Air Force Base Museum, California. Art was very rare on the B-26Ks operating in the war zone. (H. W. Rued)

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Batgirl was a Douglas A-26K Counter-Invader (serial 64-17645) with the 609th Special Operations Squadron at Nakhon Phanom Air Base, Thailand in the Summer of 1968. (AFM)

TWEETY BIRD was typical of the personal markings applied to EC – 475 from the 460th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at NKP during July of 1972. (John Poole)

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The Grey Ghost was a McDonnell F-101В Voodoo from the 116th Fighter Interceptor Squadron/Washington Air National Guard that was loaned to the Colorado State University for clear air turbulence flight tests during 1974. (Hugh Muir)

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(Left) A fine example of the chalked ‘artwork’ found on many aircraft after the 1970 7th Air Force edict that banned nose art on 7th AF air­craft was seen on MADAME PELE, a F-4D of the 435th TFS/8th TFW at Ubon during the LINEBACKER operations in 1972. (John Poole )

The Sick Eagle was a Grumman C-1A Trader Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD) aircraft assigned to USS ORISKANY (CVA-34). At this time the aircraft was on the ramp at Danang Air Base, South Vietnam during October of 1967. (Tom Hartsen)

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A late 60s term with a double meaning was “Fly United”, as shown here on an AC-119K Stinger gunship assigned to the 18th Special Operations Squadron at Phan Rang, South Vietnam. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce)

The City Of El Paso was a B-52B assigned to the 95th Bomb Wing at Biggs Air Force Base, Texas. It was displayed for a time at the Air Force Museum before finally being scrapped in the late 1970s. (Author)

COPYRIGHT 1995 SQUADRON/SIGNAL PUBLICATIONS, INC

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(Right) In 1970 the 7th Air Force ordered the removal of ail nose art. The crews countered by painting the art on the inside of the nose gear door as illustrated by Muff Diver, a F-4D Phantom of the 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Udorn, Thailand during July of 1971. (via Tom Brewer)

Napalm Nellie rests in the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base salvage yard following her combat tour in Vietnam with Heavy Attack Squadron 21 (VAH-21) which was based at Cam Ranh Bay, South Vietnam. The Lockheed AP-2H Neptune flew trail interdiction mis sions over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. She carries seventy-one Black bomb mission markings under her ribbon bar. (Mick Roth)

Even civilian aircraft had nose art. The el pajaro grande (the big bird), was a Douglas DC-3 (N778X) based at Mojave, California in June of 1975. (Tom Brewer)

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Even civilian aircraft got the sharkmouth treatment. This F-86 Sabre was used as a chase aircraft by the Raytheon Corporation. She car­ried her civil registration in Black on the rear fuselage and the Experimental category logo under the cockpit.

Cooter was just one of many names that this famous EF-105F car­ried. The 497th Tactical Fighter Squadron’s owl and moon “zap” was applied when the EF-105F made an emergency landing at Ubon, Thailand. The aircraft also carries a Presidential Unit Citation, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award and two Red star MiG kill markings under the cockpit. (John Julian)

(Left) BEAGLE POWER was carried on a F-105D Thunderchief of the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat, Thailand during 1969. (Dave Hansen)

Ground crewmen push The Jefferson Airplane into its revetment at Phu Cat, South Vietnam on 22 November 1970. The Cessna 0-2 was assigned to the 21st Tactical Air Support Squadron and flew Forward Air Controller missions over South Vietnam. (Norm Taylor)

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The POLISH GLIDER was a F-105D of the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli RTAB during 1970. It also carried a Polish Eagle insignia and the legend YANKEE AIR POLAK. (Doug deVlaming)

 

(Right) The “SALTY DOG’’ was a F-105 Thunderchief of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takli during 1970. (Doug deVlaming)

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Minnesota Fats was a famous pool player in the 1950s and 1960s and the name given to this A-1E Skyraider of the 1st Special Operations Squadron, 56th Special Operations Wing. The aircraft was based at NKP, Thailand during July of 1972. (John Poole)

image276“MiG” Eater was another of the VF-31 F-4J Phantoms that deployed to Nellis Air Force Base for RED FLAG in 1975. (Hugh Muir)

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image278Подпись: шЧ -- ‘ • * tv' ШШ Уь- : 1 image279"

Подпись: Sharkmouth decorations were the rage during and immediately after the Vietnam War. Even stateside units such as VX-4 painted some of their TA-4J Skyhawks during 1975. At the time the unit was stationed at Naval Air Station Miramar, California. (Hugh Muir)
Подпись: (Below) Bud Man was a F-4J Phantom serving with VF-31 aboard USS SARATOGA. The markings were added when the unit deployed to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada in 1975 to take part in an Air Force RED FLAG exercise. (Hugh Muir)

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Подпись: The Lanie Gale Express was a F-4E Phantom of the 308th Tactical Fighter Squadron/31 st Tactical Fighter Wing at Udorn Royal Thai Air Base during 1972. The 308th TFS was TDY at Udorn and temporarily assigned to the 432d Tactical Fighter Wing. (John Poole)

This U. S. Army QF-86F drone carried Walt Disney’s famous Mickey Mouse character on the gun bay door. The aft fuselage and outer wingtips are painted Gloss Orange. These air­craft were used as tar­gets for anti-aircraft mis­sile training. (George Bracken)

THOR’S HAMMER was typical of the personal markings carried by F – 100 Super Sabres with the 309th Tactical Fighter Squadron/31st Tactical Fighter Wing based at Tuy Hoa, South Vietnam in April of 1970. (USAF) (Right) Squadron mates hose down the pilot of NASHVILLE SOUND, a F-100D of the 90th TActical Fighter Squadron, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing at Tuy Hoa, South Vietnam after completing his 100th mission. (Ron Picciani)

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HALF A YARD was an EF-105F flown by Lieutenant Colonel Ed Moriarty of the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli during 1970.The aircraft carries a full load of eight 750 pound bombs. (USAF)

COPYRIGHT 1995 SQUADRON/SIGNAL PUBLICATIONS, INC

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Colonel Ed Walsh, commander of the 56th Special Operations Wing, celebrates his 100th mission in front of his A-1H named THE PROUD AMERICAN. His crew chief has also added another legend on the fuselage side which read, “COL Walsh #1 Boss c/c SGTClark.” In addition to the names, the aircraft carried an eagle on the engine cowling. (Frank Murray)

A Snake and the name MAGNET ASP were carried on the fuselage of this F-105D of the Virginia Air National Guard at Richmond, Virginia during 1973. The aircraft carries the National Guard badge on the fin along with the legend VIRGINIA in White above the serial number. After the Vietnam War, a number of F-105s were transferred to the Reserve and National Guard. (Joe Bruch)

image286"This sharkmouthed F-105G Wild Weasel of the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Korat, Thailand during 1972 carried the name WHITE LIGHT­NING and a White flash on the intake lip. The aircraft is armed with a Shrike anti-radiation guided missile on the outboard wing pylon. The canopy rails were painted Blue with the crew’s named in White. (Doug Remington)

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BALLS A ‘ FIRE was a very weathered A-1H Skyraider of the 1st Special Operations Squadron assigned to the SANDY rescue mission. The aircraft was armed with bomblet dispensers, mini-gun pods, and napalm tanks in addition to its internal 20mm cannons. The Sandy A-1s were kept in their revetments fully armed and fueled, ready to go at a moments notice. (Don Garrett Jr.)

image290"The IRON DUKE taxies out loaded with four 750 pound bombs on the wing pylons and a centerline fuel tank. The F-105D was assigned to the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, during 1969. (John Julian)

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A pair of A-1H Skyraiders of the 602nd Air Commando Squadron, THE LOVE MACHINE (foreground) and THE GOOD BUDDHA (back­ground), are led by an OV-10 Bronco of the 23rd Tactical Air Support Squadron, (via Ron Thurlow)

The Jolly Roger, a F-105D of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing flies for­mation on a KC-135 tanker. In addition to its name, the Thunderchief also had a small skull and cross-bones on the intake lip in Black. (John Julian)

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BAD NEWS was an A-1J Skyraider SANDY on detachment to Danang. SANDY detachments were based at various locations around South Vietnam and Thailand. (Don Garrett Jr.)

A Yellow “Happy Face” inside a sunburst and the name YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE were carried on the nose of this F-100D Super Sabre of the 306th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Tuy Hoa, South Vietnam during 1970. ( Joe Vincent)

S. P.F: III was a Yellow and White Bee with Red blood dripping from its stinger. This unusual art and name was carried on the nose of a F-100D Super Sabre of the 306th Tactical Fighter Squadron/31 st Tactical Fighter Wing at Tuy Hoa, South Vietnam during late 1969. By this time, the F-100 was only being used over South Vietnam in support of troops in contact. (Joe Vincent)

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CORN FED was an A-1E Skyraider of the 602nd Air Commando Squadron based at Nakhon Phanom (NKP), Thailand during 1970. The Skyraiders were very reliable but by this time were beginning to show their age. (JEM Slides)

(Left) SGT Leonard Williams works on TINKER, a F-100D of the 352nd Tactical Fighter Squadron at Phan Rang, South Vietnam dur­ing September of 1969. The name was Yellow with Black shading. (Air Force Museum)

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This singing cartoon character was carried on a Republic F-105F Wild Weasel attached to “Ryan’s Raiders,” the 13th TFS, during 1968. (Jon Alquist)

 

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This Indian character was painted on an EF-105F (serial 63-8327) of the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing based at Korat, Thailand during 1968. The indian is carrying a Shrike anti-radiation guided missile, the standard weapon for Wild Weasel EF-105FS. (Dave Hansen)

OKIE JODY on the ramp at Danang Air Base, South Vietnam during May of 1967. The F-105D Thunderchief was assigned to the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing. The name was in Yellow. (Neal Schneider via Tom Hansen)

Подпись:A cartoon Viking maiden and the name Ye Ole Battle-Ax were carried on the splitter plate of this RF-4C Phantom II (serial 65-0548) of the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron based at Udorn, Royal Thai Air Force Base during March of 1970. The RF-4C replaced the RF – 101 Voodoo for missions over North Vietnam. (Colonel J. Ward Boyce.)

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OLD CROW II was a Republic F-105D Thunderchief flown by Colonel С. E. Anderson of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli Royal Thai Air Base during 1968. The art was a Crew dressed in top hat and tails. Colonel Anderson had been a Second World War ace with the 357th FG and carried the same art on his P-51D. (Colonel С. E. Anderson)

SIZZLIN Susie was a F-100D Super Sabre at Phu Cat Air Base, South Vietnam during 1970. The F-100 was used primarily for operations over South Vietnam since it lacked the electronic warfare equipment for offensive bombing operations over the heavily defended North. (USAF)

“PRUDI’S PRIDE” was a F-105D Thunderchief of the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Korat, Thailand during 1969. The aircraft was flown by Captian Bob Nesbitt. (Dave Hansen)

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SUGAR FOOT ///was a F-4D Phantom II of the 559th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Cam Ranh Bay, South Vietnam during September of 1969. The Phantom was flown by the commander of the 12th Tactical Fighter Wing. (Richard Kierbow)

Jinkin Jose was painted on an EF-105F. The name was Yellow out­lined in Black, her bikini was in Yellow and the SAM missile was in White.

image309"The THUNDERCHIEF was painted on an EF-105F Thunderchief of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing at Takhli during 1968. The name was in Red, the lightning bolt was in Yellow outlined in Black and the indian had a White head-dress with Black tips to the feathers. The head – band was Red, White and Black, the lower portion of the feathers were Red and the disk was in Yellow. (Doug deVlaming)

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